De Ma Cuisine

Friday

12

February 2016

0

COMMENTS

Chunky Vegetable Soup

Written by , Posted in Beans, Dairy-Free, Dinner, Fruit, Gluten Free, Herbs, Lunch, Main Dishes, Potatoes, Soups, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

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When in doubt, soup! I almost always want to eat soup. In hot weather and cold weather, on weeknights or at dinner parties… give me soup and I’ll be happy with my meal.

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Soup is a great way to use up whatever you’ve got hanging around in the crisper drawers of the fridge too. Sometimes there are forgotten turnips and beets in there that are given a new chance at life in soup. Way yummier than tossing them in the compost or using them for stock.

This week I had things like leeks, spinach, sweet potatoes, peas, and rutabagas on hand. But, you could add or substitute with onions, shallots, kohlrabi, carrots, turnips, radishes, brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, potatoes, or winter squash.

So many options!

I wanted to add a little more protein and even more texture to this soup, so I also added beans. I was in the mood for kidney, but black, white, or cannellini would also be fab. And when we get into spring, fava beans would be amazing! I love beans in soup.

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This soup makes for a great lunch or dinner. It’s wonderful with homemade croissants, apple-cheese toasts, or just on its own with a squeeze of lemon and a good book.

Happy Eating!

Chunky Vegetable Soup

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 52 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 7 minutes

Yield: 8

Chunky Vegetable Soup

Ingredients

  • 1 T olive oil
  • 2 C leek/onion/shallot, chopped
  • 5 C any: kohlrabi, carrot, rutabaga, turnip, winter squash, brussels sprouts, cabbage, collards, broccoli, cauliflower, sweet potatoes, potatoes, radish; peeled, if warranted, chopped
  • to taste salt
  • dash cayenne (or may use 1/2 to 1 small hot pepper, ribs and seeds removed, minced)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 T rice vinegar
  • 7 C veggie stock
  • 1 t fresh thyme (or 1/4 t dried)
  • 1/2 t dried rosemary (or 1/2 T fresh)
  • 2 T fresh basil (or 2 t dried)
  • to taste pepper
  • 2 C greens (kale, spinach, chard, mustard greens, mizuna, bok choy... anything that you have on hand will work), chopped
  • 1 1/2 C beans (black, kidney, white, cannellini)
  • 1 C peas (frozen, or shelled fresh peas or fava beans)
  • lemon wedges, for serving
  • good olive oil, for serving

Instructions

  1. Heat a soup pot over medium-low. Add olive oil. Add leek-cayenne (if you're using dried herbs you may add them now too). Cook, stirring occasionally, for about 10-15 minutes, or until the veggies are getting tender. Add garlic and vinegar and cook for 1 minute more. Add the stock through pepper and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook for about 10 minutes. Add the greens, beans, and peas and cook for 3 minutes more. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired.
  2. Ladle into bowls and serve with a squeeze of lemon and a drizzle of olive oil.
http://www.de-ma-cuisine.com/chunky-vegetable-soup/

Tuesday

9

February 2016

0

COMMENTS

How to Use 8 Winter Veggies

Written by , Posted in How To, Thoughts, Vegetables

With the colder weather comes the heartier, sturdier winter veggies. Things like kohlrabi, beets, and daikon radishes take the place of the more delicate summer squash, snap peas, and tomatoes. With each season there are some things that are much easier to figure out what to do with than others. This also comes from experience, of course. If you’re in your first season of ever eating beets, they can be a challenge to figure out. But, after a while, they’re a synch.

Here are some of my favorite ways to use some of winter’s finest, and a little bit about them.

Beets

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Beets, while often deep red in color (perfect for staining your hands, so beware), can also be golden or striped in color. They are one of those veggies that need to be cut into to truly show off their beauty. Beets have a sweet, earthy flavor. They are fabulous with citrus, goat cheese, and pasta. They can be steamed, roasted, or sautéed, to name just a few great ways to cook them.

Some of my favorite ways to enjoy beets are as: PicklesTwice Cooked Beets with Pomegranates and Goat Cheese, and in a Warm Beet Salad with Fruit and Nuts.

Daikon Radishes

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Daikon radishes have a more mild and sweet flavor than the smaller red radishes, which can really pack an awesome spicy punch. They are so versatile. I use them in everything from stir fry to soups to raw in a salad. They pair well with carrots, mild cheeses, and other root veggies. They’re a fabulous addition to Hearty Kale and White Bean Quesadillas and Broccoli and Goat Cheese Wraps, and the star of Radish and Feta Toasts.

Escarole

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Escarole is kinda like a sturdier lettuce. Almost like a cross between cabbage and romaine, with a hint of bitterness. It can be eaten raw or cooked, which is a bonus. It pairs well with eggs, beans, and lemons.

I like to chop it up and use it in a Caesar Salad. It’s also great added to soup, near the end of the cooking time like you’d do with the greens in this Ham and Greens Chowder.

Fennel

Fennel

Fennel has a texture similar to celery, but has an anise or licorice flavor and is more pronounced when it’s raw. It’s great used as the boat in Tuna Boats, and in lots of great salads. Since I prefer it to be more subdued, I love it best when it’s cooked. I especially like it in Roasted Stone Fruit with Bulgur and Fennel (in the winter apples could be subbed for stone fruit), on Fennel Pizza, and in a super hearty Chicken Noodle Soup. Fennel pairs well with arugula, beans, and cheese.

Kale

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Kale has a sweet green flavor. It’s not bitter and it’s super sturdy. It can be difficult to digest, but one way to counter that is to massage the kale prior to eating (seriously!). Kale pairs well with citrus, beans, and root veggies (especially potatoes). It can be prepared in so so many ways. It’s great raw and massaged in salads and blended up in smoothies, blitzed up into a pesto and served on Spicy Twice Baked Sweet Potatoes or Garlic and Herb Bread, cooked in Hearty White Bean and Kale Quesadillas, Potato Pancakes, or crisped up as Kale Chips.

Kohlrabi

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Kohlrabi are cute little Yoda-looking veggies. They have a taste similar to a combination of broccoli, cauliflower, and cabbage. Kohlrabi pairs well with cheese (especially parmesan), dill, and vinegar. It’s great raw, in salads or with dip, I love it cooked in Kohlrabi Stew or steamed in Kohlrabi Stuffed with Cabbage and Apples.

Leeks

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Leeks are what I’d consider the onion’s second cousins. They’re milder than an onion or a shallot (first cousins), but still have a sweet oniony flavor. They often have a lot of dirt between the layers, so it’s important to wash well (I like to cut them into rings, swish around in a bowl of water, let the grit fall to the bottom, then remove and chop as desired). But, they won’t make you cry when you cut them, which is a definite bonus. I use leeks, onions, and shallots interchangeably. But, leeks specifically pair well with herbs like parsley, sorrel, basil, rosemary, and thyme, potatoes (like in this Leek and Potato Soup) and other root veggies, and they are great with cheese (you could sauté some leeks and add them to a Winter Squash Dip, or sub the winter squash for leeks and yogurt/cream cheese/blue cheese/silken tofu, or add them to this Artichoke Heart Dip).

Lemongrass

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The taste of lemongrass reminds me a little of Froot Loops, which were a very rare and special treat for my brothers and I when we were kids. It smells kinda like lemon and grass, interestingly enough. It’s fabulous in Asian cuisine, like in this Sweet and Spicy Lemongrass Stir Fry. It pairs well with coconut milk, veggies like carrots, garlic, and ginger, and is great in soups like Thai Basil and Peanut Soup.

Happy Eating!

Some paring ideas from The Vegetarian Flavor Bible.

Friday

5

February 2016

0

COMMENTS

Kohlrabi Stuffed with Cabbage and Apple

Written by , Posted in Cheese, Dairy-Free, Dinner, Fruit, Gluten Free, Grains, Herbs, Leftovers, Main Dishes, Meat, Nuts, Poultry, Quinoa, Rice, Sausage, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

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When I think of kohlrabi, I think of a taste that’s like a combination of broccoli and cauliflower. It’s kinda sweet and mild and buttery. When I look at kohlrabi, I think of Yoda… Green, kinda funny looking, but really awesome when you give it a try.

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Steaming seemed like the best way to soften the kohlrabi without rendering them tough. They’re pretty dense, so it took a while, but that gave me plenty of time to work on a nice filling. I used leek, radish, cabbage, and apple. If you wanted to change those out for something else you could try shallots, onions, or carrots. Any type of cabbage would be great. Purple cabbage would add some great color, but I had green, and it was great. Thyme, basil, and parsley were the perfect herbs to compliment the kohlrabi and the filling. And some protein rounded out the dish to make it a main, rather than just a side. I used turkey, but chicken, tempeh, or even tofu would be awesome too!

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Nuts and parmesan cheese are perfect for topping. If you want to keep it vegan, some nutritional yeast would be a great alternative to the cheese. I love to squeeze some lemon over most everything. This dish was no different. I prefer to have two lemon wedges at the ready. One for the start, and one to use partway through.

Happy Eating!

Kohlrabi Stuffed with Cabbage and Apple

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 50 minutes

Yield: 4

Kohlrabi Stuffed with Cabbage and Apple

Ingredients

  • 4 kohlrabi, top and bottom sliced off, peeled if desired, but it's not necessary, greens reserved
  • 1 T olive oil
  • 1 C leek/shallot/onion, diced
  • 1/2 C radish or carrot, diced
  • 1 C cabbage, chopped
  • 1 apple, diced
  • to taste salt
  • to taste pepper
  • 1 t fresh thyme (or 1/4 t dried)
  • 1 T fresh basil (or 1 t dried), chopped
  • 1 t dried parsley (or 1 T fresh), crushed
  • pinch cayenne (or 1/2 hot pepper, ribs and seeds removed, minced) (optional)
  • 1 C turkey or chicken or sausage (cooked)/tempeh/tofu
  • 1 C brown rice or quinoa (cooked)
  • 1 bunch kohlrabi greens (or kale, chard, spinach, bok choy etc...), chopped
  • parmesan cheese, grated, or nutritional yeast, for topping
  • almonds, chopped, for topping
  • lemon wedges, for serving (2/serving)

Instructions

  1. Place kohlrabi cut side down in a steamer basket with about 2" boiling water in the bottom of a pot. Cover and steam for about 30-40 minutes, over medium heat, until kohlrabi is tender and pierces easily with a knife. Remove, let cool slightly, and scoop out the middle (and mash or chop and set aside).
  2. While kohlrabi steams, heat a skillet and add olive oil. Add leek through thyme and cook over medium-low heat for about 10 minutes. Add basil through kohlrabi greens, plus any of the center of the kohlrabi. Cook until all veggies are tender and the meat or tempeh/tofu is heated through, about 5 minutes. Taste for seasoning.
  3. Spoon filling into hollowed out kohlrabi. Top with parmesan or nutritional yeast and almonds. Serve with lemon wedges for squeezing.
http://www.de-ma-cuisine.com/kohlrabi-stuffed-with-cabbage-and-apple/

Friday

29

January 2016

0

COMMENTS

Pickled Beets and Cabbage

Written by , Posted in Canning, Condiments, Dairy-Free, Gluten Free, Pickling, Quick and Easy, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

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Pickles are one of life’s great mysteries. I don’t quite understand why or how they are so awesome. They just are. They can add so much to a dish. They’re fun to eat. And, they’re a lot simpler to make than I would have thought. I’ve tried to make pickles a few times before. I’ve followed recipes and made up my own. Nothing worked. I tried with raw veggies and lots of apple cider vinegar. Nothing tasted good. So I was a little apprehensive when I was thinking about pickling for a post… But, I have to say, I was pleasantly surprised.

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It all starts with some veggies. I chose steamed beets (because I’d tried to pickle raw beets once… nope, not a good idea) and raw cabbage. I used them because that’s what I had on hand. But, I think that with this particular brine, I might also try carrots, cauliflower, radish, green beans, greens, leeks, cucumber, or onions. I’d steam any root veggies and cauliflower, but I’d probably leave the rest raw.

For the brine, I went with white vinegar and rice vinegar. I like their mild flavors. I also added some water, salt, and honey. Water to dilute a bit, honey to counter the sharp vinegar, and salt, well, because I like salt (and I think you’re supposed to use salt when pickling, although this was just plain table salt, not pickling salt).

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I added a few extras, based on the veggies I was using. To go with the beets I used: garlic, orange zest, and peppercorns. With the cabbage I used garlic, red pepper flakes, and peppercorns. You could also add dill, chives, fresh ginger, or lemon zest, depending on the veggie to be pickled.

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I let them sit for about a week and a half in the fridge before trying them. I don’t know if I needed to, but I did.

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Now that they’re open, I’ve eaten the pickled beets 3 days in a row. I just can’t get enough. Tim even tried one the other day and didn’t hate it. He wasn’t crazy about the texture of the beets (they’re soft, like they are when steamed), but he really liked the flavor of the brine. For me, the beets are exactly the texture I was hoping for. They’re tender and vinegary with just a hint of sweet. And the cabbage, it’s gone. I ate it. All. By. Myself. I tried it raw, I added it to a stir fry, and I added it (and the pickled garlic) to some lentils and topped it with a fried egg, paprika, cayenne, and chili powder. I can’t wait until the next time cabbage comes in our Abundant Harvest Organics box. I know exactly how I want to use it.

Happy Eating!

Pickled Beets and Cabbage

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 50 minutes

Yield: 2 pints

Pickled Beets and Cabbage

Ingredients

  • 3-4 C any: beets, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, radish, green beans, greens, leeks, cucumber, onions; chopped, shredded, sliced, quartered (depending on type of veggie)
  • 1 1/2 C vinegar (white vinegar and rice vinegar)
  • 1 1/2 C water
  • 1 T + 1 t salt
  • 1 T + 1 t honey
  • 1/4 C any extras (choose based on veggies using): peppercorns, garlic, dill, chives, fresh ginger, lemon zest, orange zest, red pepper flakes

Instructions

  1. Sterilize jars and lids.
  2. Steam any root veggies or cauliflower until tender (about 20-30 minutes, depending on the veggie) and then cut as desired. Leave things like cabbage, green beans, greens, leeks, and onions raw.
  3. Bring brining liquid (vinegar through honey) to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes.
  4. Place extras in the bottom of the jars, place veggies in the jars, packing fairly tightly but leaving about an inch of space at the top. Pour brining liquid over, filling to cover veggies. Wipe the rims and cover with the lid. Cool to room temperature then refrigerate.
http://www.de-ma-cuisine.com/pickled-beets-and-cabbage/

Tuesday

26

January 2016

0

COMMENTS

Ten Ways to Use Cabbage

Written by , Posted in How To, Thoughts

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I love cabbage. It’s versatile and can be used in so many ways. It tastes great and when you get a head of cabbage there’s so much to it that it seems to last forever (in a good way).

Here are some ideas that I think are great.

Borscht is a soup that is a tradition in my family. My Oma used to make it, as did her parents and probably her grandparents too. It’s a humble soup, I think from a time and place where there wasn’t much. It takes simple ingredients, cabbage, potatoes, and beets, and transforms them into something hearty and nutritious. Oh and bonus, it tastes even better the second day.

Cabbage Rolls Cabbage has great sturdy leaves for holding the filling in. The bigger the better for this, unless you’re looking to make some appetizers or little bites. These are a great make ahead dish. You could make a big batch and freeze the leftovers for a day that you’re too tired to cook.

Tuna Boats Cabbage is a great sturdy boat for tuna, but not just that, its sweet flavor is the perfect compliment.

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Thai Basil and Peanut Soup Shredded cabbage and creamy peanut soup – that’s a great idea.

Veggie Pot Pie is a great way to clean out the fridge. So many great veggies can come together in a pot pie. If I didn’t have anything else on hand, I might even just use cabbage. I like it that much.

Individual Red Cabbage and Apple Tarts As I was saying about the veggie pot pie that would be great with just cabbage, well, this is cabbage and apple, and it’s just divine. So much so that I did an episode of A Cooking Show with Rachel O about it a few years ago.

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Bulgur Wheat with Sausage and Apples This is a great one for a tired weeknight. It’s easy, yummy, and filling. Plus, the veggie possibilities are kinda endless. I think I’d like this with cabbage and carrots.

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Stir Fry Cabbage can be great in stir fry. It can be as simple as using it to replace the red choi when you don’t have any on hand. Or, you could quickly stir fry some cabbage and onions with chicken or tofu. Dinner in no time!

Hot Napa Slaw Cabbage is great in both hot and cold coleslaws. In this one, the cabbage is reduced down and served as a delicious and savory side. The perfect compliment to a roast. And maybe, if there are leftovers, you’d want to eat them for breakfast topped with a fried egg with a piece of buttered toast.

Pulled Pork Sandwiches with Coleslaw A few years ago, when I was still filming A Cooking Show with Rachel O, I thought it would be fun to make a pulled pork sandwich and top it with coleslaw. And what a delicious idea it was!

Happy Eating!