De Ma Cuisine

ginger Archive

Friday

29

January 2016

2

COMMENTS

Pickled Beets and Cabbage

Written by , Posted in Canning, Condiments, Dairy-Free, Gluten Free, Pickling, Quick and Easy, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

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Pickles are one of life’s great mysteries. I don’t quite understand why or how they are so awesome. They just are. They can add so much to a dish. They’re fun to eat. And, they’re a lot simpler to make than I would have thought. I’ve tried to make pickles a few times before. I’ve followed recipes and made up my own. Nothing worked. I tried with raw veggies and lots of apple cider vinegar. Nothing tasted good. So I was a little apprehensive when I was thinking about pickling for a post… But, I have to say, I was pleasantly surprised.

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It all starts with some veggies. I chose steamed beets (because I’d tried to pickle raw beets once… nope, not a good idea) and raw cabbage. I used them because that’s what I had on hand. But, I think that with this particular brine, I might also try carrots, cauliflower, radish, green beans, greens, leeks, cucumber, or onions. I’d steam any root veggies and cauliflower, but I’d probably leave the rest raw.

For the brine, I went with white vinegar and rice vinegar. I like their mild flavors. I also added some water, salt, and honey. Water to dilute a bit, honey to counter the sharp vinegar, and salt, well, because I like salt (and I think you’re supposed to use salt when pickling, although this was just plain table salt, not pickling salt).

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I added a few extras, based on the veggies I was using. To go with the beets I used: garlic, orange zest, and peppercorns. With the cabbage I used garlic, red pepper flakes, and peppercorns. You could also add dill, chives, fresh ginger, or lemon zest, depending on the veggie to be pickled.

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I let them sit for about a week and a half in the fridge before trying them. I don’t know if I needed to, but I did.

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Now that they’re open, I’ve eaten the pickled beets 3 days in a row. I just can’t get enough. Tim even tried one the other day and didn’t hate it. He wasn’t crazy about the texture of the beets (they’re soft, like they are when steamed), but he really liked the flavor of the brine. For me, the beets are exactly the texture I was hoping for. They’re tender and vinegary with just a hint of sweet. And the cabbage, it’s gone. I ate it. All. By. Myself. I tried it raw, I added it to a stir fry, and I added it (and the pickled garlic) to some lentils and topped it with a fried egg, paprika, cayenne, and chili powder. I can’t wait until the next time cabbage comes in our Abundant Harvest Organics box. I know exactly how I want to use it.

Happy Eating!

Pickled Beets and Cabbage

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 50 minutes

Yield: 2 pints

Pickled Beets and Cabbage

Ingredients

  • 3-4 C any: beets, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, radish, green beans, greens, leeks, cucumber, onions; chopped, shredded, sliced, quartered (depending on type of veggie)
  • 1 1/2 C vinegar (white vinegar and rice vinegar)
  • 1 1/2 C water
  • 1 T + 1 t salt
  • 1 T + 1 t honey
  • 1/4 C any extras (choose based on veggies using): peppercorns, garlic, dill, chives, fresh ginger, lemon zest, orange zest, red pepper flakes

Instructions

  1. Sterilize jars and lids.
  2. Steam any root veggies or cauliflower until tender (about 20-30 minutes, depending on the veggie) and then cut as desired. Leave things like cabbage, green beans, greens, leeks, and onions raw.
  3. Bring brining liquid (vinegar through honey) to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes.
  4. Place extras in the bottom of the jars, place veggies in the jars, packing fairly tightly but leaving about an inch of space at the top. Pour brining liquid over, filling to cover veggies. Wipe the rims and cover with the lid. Cool to room temperature then refrigerate.
http://www.de-ma-cuisine.com/pickled-beets-and-cabbage/

Friday

11

December 2015

0

COMMENTS

Persimmon Apple Bread

Written by , Posted in Baking, Bread, Breakfast, Brunch, Dairy-Free, Dessert, Eggs, Fruit, Grains, Kid-Friendly, Nuts, Snacks, Vegetables, Vegetarian

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I don’t know if the old adage, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away” is true. But, apples have always been a favorite of mine, so if I can eat an apple every day that makes me happy. My favorite way to enjoy them is raw. Sliced, whole, chopped… it doesn’t matter. Since we go through apples pretty quickly, they don’t often get cooked. We either don’t feel the need, or there just aren’t any left. But, sometimes, I need to bake bread, and the bread needs to be studded with apples.

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For this recipe I used Pippins. But, in my kitchen, I’d use whatever I have on hand. I’m sure the experts would disagree. There are some apples that are better for baking (Granny Smiths), and some that are best eaten out of hand (Fujis and Galas). But, as I’ve mentioned before, I’m a frugal cook, so I prefer to make do and adapt to what I’ve got, if at all possible.

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This bread is a dense, muffin-like bread. You could call it an Apple Snack Cake if that’s more appealing to someone that you’re trying to convince to try it. You could bake it in muffin tins if that’s easier or more manageable.

When persimmons are no longer in season you could add a super ripe (or frozen then thawed) banana. When apples are no longer in season, you could sub pears, Asian pears, persimmons, figs, cherries, or stone fruit. If you wanted to add some grated veggies, carrots, parsnips, or summer squash could be easily hidden (ok, maybe not the carrots, but you wouldn’t taste them too much). You could add nuts and seeds, raisins, dried cherries or cranberries (why don’t we call raisins “dried grapes”?), or maybe even chocolate chips.

What I’m trying to say is, it’s pretty versatile.

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Like many baked goods, the dry ingredients are combined first, then set aside. The wet ingredients come together next. Everyone jumps into the bowl, then into a greased loaf pan. Easy. Quick. Snack attack time is near.

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I would suggest letting the bread cool completely before slicing. If it’s still warm it may be a little too crumbly (although still yummy).

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I opted for simple, and topped it with some homemade butter. But, you could also top it with caramel and serve it for dessert. You might spread some cream cheese on a slice, or top the whole thing with cream cheese frosting. Or, as an ode to one of my favorite snacks, eat it for breakfast topped with some crunchy peanut butter.

Peanut butter and apples. Apples and cheese. Apples and almonds… apples and almost anything.

Happy Eating!

Persimmon Apple Bread

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 55 minutes

Yield: 6-8

Serving Size: 1 to 1.5 slices

Persimmon Apple Bread

Ingredients

  • 1 C whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 t salt
  • 1/2 t baking powder
  • 1/2 t baking soda
  • 1/4 t cinnamon
  • 1 t fresh ginger, minced (or 1/4 t ground)
  • 1/2 C cold unsalted butter (could sub cold coconut oil), cut into small chunks
  • 1 C oats (can also use granola)
  • 1 1/4 C apples (or chopped pears, Asian pears, persimmons, figs, cherries, stone fruit, or grated carrots, parsnips, or summer squash), chopped
  • 1/2 C persimmon pulp
  • 1 egg
  • 1 t apple cider vinegar
  • 1 t vanilla extract
  • 1 T maple syrup
  • optional, for topping: seeds or chopped nuts

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 350F.
  2. Whisk the flour through ginger. Mix in butter or oil with a pastry blender or hands (until it resembles a coarse meal or pea sized chunks). Stir in oats and fruit. Set in the freezer while you assemble wet ingredients.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the persimmon pulp through maple syrup. Add dry ingredients and stir to combine.
  4. Scoop into a greased loaf pan (or into greased muffin tins). Top with nuts and seeds if using. Bake for 35-40 minutes (20-22 for muffins), or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.
  5. Remove from the oven and cool in the pan for 5 minutes. Remove from the pan and cool completely on a cooling rack.
http://www.de-ma-cuisine.com/persimmon-apple-bread/

Monday

30

November 2015

0

COMMENTS

Twice Cooked Beets with Pomegranates and Goat Cheese

Written by , Posted in Appetizers, Cheese, Dairy-Free, Fruit, Gluten Free, Herbs, Lunch, Nuts, Quick and Easy, Sides, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

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It’s chilly today. And it’s delightful. I’m still wearing flip flops, but I’ve got thick socks on too (don’t judge). I’ve been seeing on social media that some places are already getting snow. I complain about how hot it is here at this time of year, but I wonder, if we were to move somewhere with four real seasons, would I complain then too? Probably.

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One of the great things about the mild winters that we have is the produce is bountiful all year long. I’m trying to look on the bright side, to be positive, to think up rather than down. Not easy for a pessimist to do. But, this, this is definitely a plus.

Beets are in season right now. So are pomegranates. Both have stained my hands red. I’m ok with that. I used some of the red coloring from the beets to try to dye some homemade tortillas. They may just end up looking pink. I’m ok with that too.

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The idea for this dish was to so something quick and easy with beets. Steaming them takes less time than roasting, so that’s what I opted for. I had some potatoes to steam for another dish, so I reused the water. If you don’t have anything else to cook, you could add a little more water, throw in your vegetable scraps, and make some veggie stock.

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Honey, goat cheese, garlic, and ginger compliment the beets’ earthy flavor. Because it gets broiled, the raw flavors mellow a bit. But, you could always use roasted garlic and powdered ginger if you want to tone it down even more.

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Variations on this dish: Chop up the steamed beets and toss with the cheese mixture and broil. You could serve this as a dip, or just alongside your main dish. Tofu or vegan cheese can be substituted for the goat or feta cheese and yogurt. I used to be a non-goat cheese eater. This is the second recipe that I’ve made where I enjoyed it though, so I guess I’m coming around.

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This made a nice light lunch, but it would also be great alongside some quinoa or pilaf for a heartier lunch, or for dinner. Maybe as a nice change from Thanksgiving leftovers later in the week?

Happy Eating!

Twice Cooked Beets with Pomegranates and Goat Cheese

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 55 minutes

Yield: 2

Serving Size: 1 whole beet

Twice Cooked Beets with Pomegranates and Goat Cheese

Ingredients

  • 2 beets, peeled and halved
  • 1 t fresh parsley, chopped (or 1/4 t dried, crumbled)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced (raw or roasted)
  • 1/4 t fresh ginger, minced (or pinch ground)
  • pinch cayenne
  • to taste salt
  • 1 t honey
  • 2 oz. goat cheese or feta or tofu
  • 1-2 T/serving plain yogurt or silken tofu, for topping
  • walnuts, chopped, for topping
  • pomegranate seeds, for topping
  • could also top with chopped cucumber

Instructions

  1. Place beets in a steamer basket in a pot with about 1 1/2" boiling water in the bottom. Cover and steam for about 20-30 minutes, or until beets are tender (easily pierced with a sharp knife).
  2. Toss parsley through cheese. Set aside.
  3. Let beets cool slightly. Slice a tiny bit off the bottom of each beet so it sits flat. Scoop center out of beets (leaving a sturdy edge) and mash into cheese filling. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired. Fill beets with filling and broil for about 2-5 minutes, watching carefully so they don't burn (in a toaster oven, it may take longer, like closer to 10 minutes).
  4. Top with yogurt or silken tofu, walnuts, and pomegranate seeds.
http://www.de-ma-cuisine.com/beets-pomegranates-cheese/

Thursday

12

November 2015

0

COMMENTS

Roasted Broccoli and Squash with a Basil and Tahini Sauce

Written by , Posted in Condiments, Dairy-Free, Dinner, Gluten Free, Herbs, Main Dishes, Pasta, Quick and Easy, Rice, Roasting, Sauces, Sides, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

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As I type this, I’m practicing my songs for the Christmas concert in December. This seems wrong because the weather doesn’t match the feel of the songs. I don’t know if it will ever not be weird to me to have 90 degree weather in October, but I’m coping. I try to avoid using the oven too much when it’s hot. But, today I made an exception. It just has to be done earlier in the day when it’s still cool out. And, even though it warms up the house a lot, it’s worth it to be rewarded with roasted veggies.

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Roasted broccoli is one of my favorite things. Sure, it can make the house smell like toots, but it tastes so good that it doesn’t really bother me. And roasted summer squash, I can eat the entire pan by myself. Easy.

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I tossed them with some olive oil, salt, pepper, and cayenne. Simple.

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While they roasted I blended together some sauce (which could be a dip, just make it a little thicker). It contained things like garlic, ginger, basil, tahini paste, and homemade yogurt. I’m totally on a homemade yogurt kick right now. It’s the best, and it’s not too difficult to make. When I make it, I feel like I’m winning at life. Same with homemade bread. I guess we all have our things that make us feel like we’ve accomplished something great. Those are two of mine.

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This sauce might be another. It’s a bit Asian-inspired, with the soy sauce (liquid aminos if you’re gluten-free) and the tahini. If you have leftovers, you might use it on an Asian Chicken Salad or a Napa Cabbage Slaw. If you don’t have tahini paste (which is ground up sesame seeds), you could use almond or peanut butter.

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I served the veggies drizzled with the sauce, over some brown rice. Other options would be to serve it over pasta, spaghetti squash, chicken, tofu, or just dip the veggies in the sauce. They’re great that way too.

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I see cooler weather in the forecast. It’s almost the season for all the roasted veggies, soups, and stews.

Happy Eating!

Roasted Broccoli and Squash with a Basil and Tahini Sauce

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes

Yield: 2

Roasted Broccoli and Squash with a Basil and Tahini Sauce

Ingredients

  • 1 head broccoli, cut into bite sized pieces (stems too, just peel the tough outer skin)
  • 1 medium or 2 small summer squash, cut into sticks
  • 1 t olive oil
  • to taste salt
  • to taste pepper
  • pinch cayenne
  • sauce: 1 T tahini paste
  • 1 t soy sauce or liquid aminos
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1/2" cube fresh ginger (or good pinch dried)
  • pinch cayenne
  • 2-3 T plain yogurt (Greek or coconut) or silken tofu
  • 1/4 t dried thyme or 1 t fresh
  • 2-3 T fresh basil
  • to taste olive oil
  • cooked rice, rice noodles, spaghetti squash, chicken, tofu, for serving (optional)

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 400F.
  2. Toss broccoli and squash with oil, salt, pepper, and cayenne. Roast for 10 minutes, flip, and roast for 10 minutes more (or until a bit crispy outside).
  3. Blend tahini through olive oil. Taste and adjust seasoning if desired.
  4. Serve veggies drizzled with sauce (over rice, rice noodles, spaghetti squash, chicken, or tofu, if desired).
http://www.de-ma-cuisine.com/roasted-broccoli-tahini-sauce/

Monday

12

October 2015

0

COMMENTS

Pomegranate and Purple Basil Iced Tea

Written by , Posted in Breakfast, Brunch, Cocktails, Dairy-Free, Drinks, Fruit, Gluten Free, Herbs, Vegetarian

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When I think of basil, I think of things like pesto, soup, risotto… even french toast. I love basil so much that I grow it in my garden – I can never seem to get enough. It’s one of the best things about summer (and fall, at least around here). The smell is intoxicating. So when purple basil came in the weekly Abundant Harvest Organics box, it seemed like the perfect time to try something new with it. I made tea.

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While basil is one of the stars of this tea, it has some pretty powerful co-stars: pomegranates and ginger. I like this combination for a few reasons.

  • It’s fun to find something new to do with pomegranates. I sometimes have trouble using them up. This recipe used two whole pomegranates. Perfect!
  • Ginger – spicy and flavorful, but that’s not all. Did you know that ginger is good for you? It’s great for the tummy and intestines. It’s anti-inflammatory, can help with nausea, and is said to reduce pain levels for individuals with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. Ginger tea is diaphoretic (warms from the inside out), so it’s great if you’ve got a cold, or if you just want to warm up.
  • On the healthy note, there are lots of studies going on about the many health benefits of pomegranates. They are being researched to find out their effect on things like free-radicals, memory, and even the common cold. Basil is also known to be a digestive aid, to help with headaches, and poor circulation. It’s also said to be an antioxidant, anti-viral, antimicrobial, and a stress reliever.

Great tasting, great for you.

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To begin, those pomegranate seeds need to be removed from the pith or membrane (for a refresher on how to do this, check out last year’s post on deseeding pomegranates). Once they’ve been removed and the skin and pith discarded, the rest of the ingredients are added.

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The seeds, ginger, basil, and honey are covered with boiling water and left to steep for a while.

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Once the tea has come to room temperature, it’s mashed (to extract as much pomegranate flavor as possible) and strained.

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After cooling completely in the fridge, it can be drunk as is with a sprig of basil for garnish.

Some fun twists: To serve it hot, either reheat the chilled tea, or just let it steep for a bit and then strain. I have a cold today, so I turned the leftover cold tea into a hot therapeutic tea. I added some more fresh ginger, a pinch of cayenne (helps me with congestion), and a bit more honey (soothes my throat) On a day when I’m feeling better, I might consider turning it into a cocktail (it could be used as a mojito base). Fresh lemons could also be added for a yummy take on lemonade.

Happy Sipping!

Pomegranate and Purple Basil Iced Tea

Prep Time: 45 minutes

Pomegranate and Purple Basil Iced Tea

Ingredients

  • 8 C water
  • 2 pomegranates, seeds removed from peel and pith
  • 2-3 t fresh ginger, diced
  • 1/4 C purple basil
  • (could also add mint or lemons)
  • 1 T + 2 t honey (or more, to taste)

Instructions

  1. Boil water.
  2. Place pomegranates through honey in a heat-proof container. Pour boiling water over. Let stand until room temperature (unless serving hot - in that case steep until flavorful enough). Mash, then press through strainer and cool completely in the refrigerator. (Could freeze some in ice cube trays to use in place of ice for serving.)

Notes

Some fun twists: To serve it hot, either reheat the chilled tea, or just let it steep for a bit and then strain. Or, to drink when I have a cold: I turned the leftover cold tea into a hot therapeutic tea. I added some more fresh ginger, a pinch of cayenne, and a bit more honey. It could be used in a cocktail (it could be used as a mojito base). Fresh lemons could also be added for a yummy take on lemonade.

http://www.de-ma-cuisine.com/pomegranate-and-purple-basil-iced-tea/

Possible health benefits are my opinions and ideas, based on the research that I’ve done, but are in no way intended to replace the advice of a qualified health care professional.
Sources:
The Encyclopedia of Healing Foods by Michael Murray, N.D., and Joseph Pizzorno, N.D., with Lara Pizzorno, M.A., L.M.T., Atria Books 2005
Reader’s Digest Foods That Harm Foods That Heal, The Reader’s Digest Association, Inc. 1997
Wikipedia