De Ma Cuisine

Canning Archive

Friday

29

January 2016

0

COMMENTS

Pickled Beets and Cabbage

Written by , Posted in Canning, Condiments, Dairy-Free, Gluten Free, Pickling, Quick and Easy, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

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Pickles are one of life’s great mysteries. I don’t quite understand why or how they are so awesome. They just are. They can add so much to a dish. They’re fun to eat. And, they’re a lot simpler to make than I would have thought. I’ve tried to make pickles a few times before. I’ve followed recipes and made up my own. Nothing worked. I tried with raw veggies and lots of apple cider vinegar. Nothing tasted good. So I was a little apprehensive when I was thinking about pickling for a post… But, I have to say, I was pleasantly surprised.

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It all starts with some veggies. I chose steamed beets (because I’d tried to pickle raw beets once… nope, not a good idea) and raw cabbage. I used them because that’s what I had on hand. But, I think that with this particular brine, I might also try carrots, cauliflower, radish, green beans, greens, leeks, cucumber, or onions. I’d steam any root veggies and cauliflower, but I’d probably leave the rest raw.

For the brine, I went with white vinegar and rice vinegar. I like their mild flavors. I also added some water, salt, and honey. Water to dilute a bit, honey to counter the sharp vinegar, and salt, well, because I like salt (and I think you’re supposed to use salt when pickling, although this was just plain table salt, not pickling salt).

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I added a few extras, based on the veggies I was using. To go with the beets I used: garlic, orange zest, and peppercorns. With the cabbage I used garlic, red pepper flakes, and peppercorns. You could also add dill, chives, fresh ginger, or lemon zest, depending on the veggie to be pickled.

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I let them sit for about a week and a half in the fridge before trying them. I don’t know if I needed to, but I did.

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Now that they’re open, I’ve eaten the pickled beets 3 days in a row. I just can’t get enough. Tim even tried one the other day and didn’t hate it. He wasn’t crazy about the texture of the beets (they’re soft, like they are when steamed), but he really liked the flavor of the brine. For me, the beets are exactly the texture I was hoping for. They’re tender and vinegary with just a hint of sweet. And the cabbage, it’s gone. I ate it. All. By. Myself. I tried it raw, I added it to a stir fry, and I added it (and the pickled garlic) to some lentils and topped it with a fried egg, paprika, cayenne, and chili powder. I can’t wait until the next time cabbage comes in our Abundant Harvest Organics box. I know exactly how I want to use it.

Happy Eating!

Pickled Beets and Cabbage

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 35 minutes

Total Time: 50 minutes

Yield: 2 pints

Pickled Beets and Cabbage

Ingredients

  • 3-4 C any: beets, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, radish, green beans, greens, leeks, cucumber, onions; chopped, shredded, sliced, quartered (depending on type of veggie)
  • 1 1/2 C vinegar (white vinegar and rice vinegar)
  • 1 1/2 C water
  • 1 T + 1 t salt
  • 1 T + 1 t honey
  • 1/4 C any extras (choose based on veggies using): peppercorns, garlic, dill, chives, fresh ginger, lemon zest, orange zest, red pepper flakes

Instructions

  1. Sterilize jars and lids.
  2. Steam any root veggies or cauliflower until tender (about 20-30 minutes, depending on the veggie) and then cut as desired. Leave things like cabbage, green beans, greens, leeks, and onions raw.
  3. Bring brining liquid (vinegar through honey) to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for 5 minutes.
  4. Place extras in the bottom of the jars, place veggies in the jars, packing fairly tightly but leaving about an inch of space at the top. Pour brining liquid over, filling to cover veggies. Wipe the rims and cover with the lid. Cool to room temperature then refrigerate.
http://www.de-ma-cuisine.com/pickled-beets-and-cabbage/

Thursday

7

August 2014

2

COMMENTS

Peach Sauce

Written by , Posted in Breakfast, Brunch, Canning, Condiments, Dessert, Fruit, Gluten Free, Kid-Friendly, Sauces, Vegetarian

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Last week I ordered twenty pounds of peaches as an add on from Abundant Harvest Organics. I thought I’d bitten off more than I could chew (haha, no pun intended) and worried that they may spoil before I got to them.

None did.

And now I have a yummy peach sauce to share with you!

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Feel free to substitute your favorite stone fruit if you’d like. Plums, nectarines, apriums, pluots, apricots… they’d all be amazing.

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Start by halving the peaches. Remove the pit, and slice or roughly chop. It’s going to be blended in a bit, so don’t worry about the shape.

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About eight to ten cups will do just fine. Out of my twenty pounds of peaches, I ended up with roughly 45 cups of sliced peaches in total. This sauce was just a small portion (I froze the rest – more about that another week).

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I added two tablespoons of butter to a large hot pot. If you don’t want to use butter, coconut oil would be just fine. The fat adds a rich quality to the sauce that I love. If you don’t want to add either, that’s cool too.

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Peaches are dumped into the hot browning butter.

Get ready for the smell. It’s amazing!

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After the peaches have cooked for about twenty minutes (and then rested for ten – not a must, I just needed more time to work on a different recipe, so they had to wait), they should look something like this.

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I had a few oranges still hanging around from spring boxes (wow they lasted a long time!!), so I whisked them up with the zest and juice from one lemon, a bit of coconut palm sugar, and a pinch of salt.

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And then, orangy-lemon juice meet smooshy peaches.

Orangeyou glad I didn’t say… I don’t know… banana?!

Sorry. Kinda.

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After the sauce cooks up for a while longer, I blended it up with my hand blender. A regular blender will work just fine too (just be sure to remove the middle part of the lid and cover the hole with a clean kitchen towel).

One more tablespoon of butter is stirred in after the sauce is blended.

Extra richy richness.

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This is gonna be good… I’m hoping that Tim will make some more Vanilla Bean Ice Cream so I can top it with some of this sauce. You could make this even more awesome by roasting some fruit to plomp on top. It would be great over French Toast or Cornmeal Pancakes, or used in place of jam.

Or, just eat it by the spoonful…

Happy Eating!

Peach Sauce
Recipe Type: Dessert, Sauces, Stone Fruit, Gluten-Free, Breakfast
Author: Rachel Oberg – De Ma Cuisine
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Sweet summer peaches are cooked up in butter and blended to make a delicious sauce.
Ingredients
  • 3 T unsalted butter (divided 2 T, 1 T)
  • 8-10 C ripe peaches, sliced or roughly chopped
  • 1 t vanilla extract
  • pinch salt
  • juice from 1 lemon
  • zest from 1 lemon
  • juice from 2-3 oranges
  • 3 T coconut palm sugar (brown sugar, maple syrup, or honey will work too)
Instructions
  1. Heat a large pot and add 2 T of butter. When butter is hot, add peaches. Cook over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, for 20 minutes, or until peaches are very soft. Let stand 10 minutes (optional).
  2. Whisk together vanilla through sugar. Add to peaches. Bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook for 20 minutes.
  3. Blend with a hand blender (it helps to tip the pot to the side a bit to prevent splattering) or a blender (in batches, with the middle part of the lid removed and a clean towel covering the hole). Stir in remaining 1 T of butter.
  4. To store, ladle into clean pint jars, leaving at least 1/2″ room at the top. You can either store in the freezer, or on the pantry shelf if using sterilized jars that have been processed as needed.
Notes
Yields 3 pint jars.

 

Thursday

17

July 2014

0

COMMENTS

How To Dry Tomatoes

Written by , Posted in Canning, Condiments, Dairy-Free, Fruit, Gluten Free, Herbs, Roasting, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

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Tomatoes are such a great fruit. It’s weird that we use them like a vegetable when they’re not one.

I’m ok with that.

They go with so much, they can be used in so many different ways.

The possibilities are pretty endless.

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Around here, the growing season for local tomatoes is pretty long. We’ve been getting them in our Abundant Harvest Organics box for about two months now.

We’re very fortunate.

But, that doesn’t mean we don’t need to preserve them and make them last as long as possible.

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I opted to dry the tomatoes by slow roasting them in the oven at a low temperature.

I love the intense flavor that roasting brings.

I’ve always called this type of tomato a “sun-dried tomato”. But, since I did not dry them in the sun, I didn’t want to lie.

Also, if I’d tried to dry them in the sun I have a feeling that a curious dog might have enjoyed a snack. They are safer in the oven.

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It’s simple: tomatoes, olive oil, and salt.

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Tomatoes are sliced thin, but not too thin. No thinner than a quarter of an inch please.

Trust me.

They will burn.

But, the dog will be happy because he will get a treat.

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Dried tomatoes are just perfection. A fabulous way to make summer tomatoes last a little longer.

Or, in our case, a fun new way to enjoy them. As they will soon be eaten.

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Since the base recipe is simple, it leaves so many options for flavoring the oil they are stored in.

I opted to make a jar of simple Italian-style, with basil, oregano, and garlic.

Other yummy options would be:

Red pepper flakes, garlic, and rosemary.

Cilantro, oregano, and jalapeño (dry the jalapeños the same way as the tomatoes).

Rosemary and garlic.

Bay leaf, garlic, and rosemary.

Dill, lemon thyme, and garlic.

Fennel seeds, garlic, and basil.

Thyme, rosemary, and oregano.

Lemon zest, basil, and garlic.

I want to make them all!

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I’ve stored them in the fridge and plan to use them quickly, on bruschetta, in pasta, and on pizza.

The olive oil, which will become a delicious flavored oil, will be used as well.

We don’t waste food around here if we can help it. 😉

Happy Eating!

Kitchen Basics: Drying Tomatoes
Recipe Type: Condiment, Preserving, Roasting, Drying, Vegetarian, Fruit
Author: Rachel Oberg – De Ma Cuisine
Preserve summer’s beautiful tomatoes by drying them and storing them in olive oil.
Ingredients
  • 2 tomatoes, sliced 1/4″ thick (no thinner, or they will burn)
  • 1-2 T olive oil
  • to taste salt
  • 1 T dried basil
  • 1 T dried oregano
  • 1 clove garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 to 3/4 C olive oil
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 250F.
  2. Line a baking sheet with a silpat or parchment paper. Place tomatoes in a single layer on the silpat or parchment paper. Drizzle generously with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt.
  3. Bake for 3 hours, turning occasionally, until tomatoes are nicely dried.
  4. Cool completely and combine in a half pint jar with herbs, garlic, and olive oil. Store in the refrigerator.
Notes
Yields: one half pint, including the oil.
3.2.1303

Thursday

3

July 2014

0

COMMENTS

Honey and Maple Syrup Sweetened Berry Jam

Written by , Posted in Breakfast, Brunch, Canning, Condiments, Dairy-Free, Dessert, Fruit, Gluten Free, Kid-Friendly, Vegetarian

StrawberryJamSecondTime-5One of my favorite things about summer is the fruit. The nectarines are amazing, the plums are incredible, and the berries… they are the best!

We had raspberries in the garden growing up, so they are my emotional favorite. Tim’s family has blackberries, so they’re a favorite too. But there’s just something about blueberries and strawberries… I love ’em.

I’m always so sad when their season ends (as it is ending now). I’m thankful for the others, don’t get me wrong. But, I want berry season to last as long as possible.

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There are plenty of ways to preserve these summer treasures. You can freeze washed berries, pitted cherries, and halved stone fruit on a baking sheet, and then pop them into a bag. You can make tons of crisps and cobblers and wrap them up really well and freeze them for November. You can make sauces and smoothies to be pulled out when the weather has turned cold.

And, you can make jam.

Last summer I decided that I would try. Surprisingly, it turned out. The catch was that I wanted to make it sans pectin and sugar. I didn’t know if you could, but I wanted to.

And I did.

I made three kinds: cherry, strawberry, and blueberry.

We ran out a few months ago. This year, I don’t intend to run out. So I made a ton. First strawberry (which follows the same recipe), then blueberry.

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Before you start, make sure you have clean jars and lids (the lid is the flat piece, and is not re-useable if you want them to seal, the band is the part that wraps around the jar and screws into place).

I don’t have a dishwasher, so I used a pot of boiling water and boiled for about ten minutes.

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I love lemon zest, so I opted to add a bunch for a hint of brightness, instead of only using lemon juice.

In general, if possible, any time I use a lemon, I zest it first. Why waste such goodness?! If there’s any extra, it goes into the freezer.

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Strawberry jam is a bit more of a process than blueberry. There’s hulling and chopping involved. 

It’s gonna be messy.

But it’s worth it.

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When I was making the strawberry, I forgot how much the stuff bubbles up. I had to move it to two pots, since the one was a bit too small.

I was wiser with the blueberries.

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It’s not going to be thick thick, like jam made with pectin. But, it will thicken up a bit. Cook it until it’s as thick as you want it (you can test it by putting a plate in the freezer and putting a dollop of jam on it so it will cool quickly, then test to see how runny it is), even if that’s longer than the time listed in the recipe.

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Jars are filled and left to cool on the counter for a bit. You should hear the lids popping as they seal. Sealed or not, I like to store them in the freezer (after fully cooling in the fridge), even after they’re opened. (There are different opinions on how long properly canned homemade jam will last unrefrigerated. (1) Since I didn’t pressure cook or process the jam in boiling water after adding it to the jars, I opted to be extra safe and keep them in the freezer, even if they did seal. In my experience, they have lasted as long as it took to consume them – less than a year, in the freezer. I hope that this summer’s batch will last more than a year, stored in the freezer. Once opened, stored in the fridge, they usually are fine for a month or two, maybe more. Just keep an eye out for mold. Jams with less sugar and that aren’t commercially prepared tend to have a shorter shelf life. (1) So be mindful of that, and whether or not you have pressure cooked them, when deciding where to store them.)

This jam is perfect for the usual toast or English muffin, to top ice cream, or to be eaten by the spoonful by a hungry food blogger.

Happy Eating! 

Blueberry or Strawberry Jam
Recipe Type: Condiment, Fruit, Preserving, Canning
Author: Rachel Oberg – De Ma Cuisine
Ingredients
  • 12 C blueberries or strawberries (strawberries: hulled and chopped)
  • 4 C honey
  • 1 C maple syrup
  • 3 T lemon zest
  • 3/4 C lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Bring berries through lemon zest to a boil. Mash with a potato masher. Once it comes to a rapid boil, cook for 3-5 minutes.
  2. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook for about 20 minutes.
  3. Remove from heat, stir in lemon juice, and let stand for 5 minutes.
  4. Ladle into jars, leaving about 1/2″ of space at the top. Cover with the lid and let stand for 15-30 minutes.
  5. Store at room temperature if they’ve sealed, or in the freezer if they haven’t (or if you just want to).
  6. Makes about 6 pints (or 12 half pints).
Notes
To sanitize jars, place in a large pot and cover with water (about 1 inch over the top of jars). Bring to a boil and boil for about 10 minutes.
3.2.1303

(1) I have referenced this site for information on the shelf life of jam.

Monday

5

August 2013

0

COMMENTS

White Peach Salsa

Written by , Posted in Appetizers, Canning, Condiments, Fruit, Gluten Free, Sauces, Snacks, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

 

White Peach Salsa
Recipe Type: Condiment, Snack, Appetizer, Sauce, Dip
Author: Rachel Oberg – De Ma Cuisine
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 1 Cup
Sweet meets spicy.
Ingredients
  • 2 C white peaches, diced
  • 1/2 to 1 t apple cider vinegar
  • pinch pepper
  • salt, to taste
  • 1 1/2 C white onion, diced
  • 1/2 C water
  • 1 chili pepper, ribs and seeds removed, diced (for spicier: leave seeds and ribs, or add another chili pepper)
  • 1/2 to 1 t lemon juice
Instructions
  1. All ingredients in a sauce pan. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer and cook for about 60 minutes, or until liquid has reduced and it’s thickened, stirring occasionally.
  2. Taste and adjust salt if needed.
  3. Pour into a jar and refrigerate.