De Ma Cuisine

Food Archive

Wednesday

12

October 2016

0

COMMENTS

Food and Family – Roasted Garlic Three Squash Soup

Written by , Posted in Dairy-Free, Dinner, Gluten Free, Lunch, Main Dishes, Roasting, Soups, Vegan, Vegetables, Vegetarian

souprtSomething my family does really well is food. We like to eat it, talk about it, think about it… We live to eat, we don’t eat to live. Usually as we’re finishing up one meal discussion about the next meal begins.

As is the custom in many places, many of our events take place around food. Christmas morning means brunch. Birthday dinners mean a special meal to celebrate the birthday person. Watching a movie in the evening means popcorn and snacks.

While we were in town an aunt and uncle from Mom’s side were also visiting. So we got together with some of the extended family for a meal. Many in our family have dietary restrictions. So we just said we’d do it potluck style and people could contribute with something they can eat. All the diets were accounted for. We range from gluten-free to vegan. But, one thing that all of our restrictions can tolerate is veggies. So I made soup.

The summer veggies were on their way out. The lighter, less nutrient dense summer squash being replaced with the heartier winter varieties. I used both. I roasted them, along with some onions, and a whole head of garlic. It was simple – olive oil and a hot oven for all of them. An hour later I plomped the roasted veggies into a soup pot with some water and let them simmer for a while. Simple and delicious.

Let’s talk about the roasted garlic again for a second. I used a whole head. I wouldn’t have done that had it been raw (unless I wanted to be the only one to enjoy the soup ;)). Roasting garlic mellows out the sharp, strong flavor. It’s one of my favorite things. It’s perfect if you need something to spread on toast, to mix in to hummus, and to add to soup.

I like to add a bit of acid to most recipes. I add it near the end, or just after it’s come off the heat. It adds a bit of brightness and finishes off a dish really nicely. Lemon or lime juice works well, so does white vinegar.

The soup was a success. My family loved it (unless they were just being polite). Squash soup is one of my favorite ways to usher in fall and soup season.

Happy Eating!

Roasted Garlic Three Squash Soup

Roasted Garlic Three Squash Soup

Ingredients

  • 2 large pattypan squash, halved, seeds scraped out
  • 1 large summer squash (zucchini or any other type), halved, seeds scraped out
  • 1 large spaghetti squash, halved, seeds scraped out
  • 3-4 onions, peeled and halved
  • 1 head garlic, top sliced off
  • oil
  • 10-12 C water or vegetable stock
  • 1 t mustard powder (or 1 T grainy mustard or dijon)
  • sprinkle cayenne
  • 2 C (approx.) coconut milk
  • 1 t honey
  • to taste salt
  • 2 1/2 t lemon juice

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 350F. Drizzle the squash and onions with oil and place cut side down on a baking sheet. Drizzle the garlic with oil and wrap in tin foil. Roast summer squash for about 30 minutes (or until tender and flesh pierces easily with a fork) and onions, garlic, and spaghetti squash for about 60 minutes (or until tender and flesh pierces easily with a fork).
  2. Let garlic cool a bit before handling. Scrape squash out of skin. Add veggies through cayenne to a soup pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 1 hour or so. Add coconut milk through salt. Heat for a few minutes. Blend until very smooth (using a hand blender, or in a blender with the plug in the lid removed and the hole covered with a clean towel). Add lemon juice. Taste for seasoning.
http://www.de-ma-cuisine.com/search-obergness-pt-4-squash-soup/

Wednesday

15

January 2014

7

COMMENTS

#TimAndRachGoToParis2013 – What We Ate

Written by , Posted in Reviews, Thoughts, Travel

Paris-WhatWeAte-2When we talked about the trip before we left, all I could think about was the food. And it didn’t disappoint (with the exception of one calzone and the pâté that I just couldn’t force myself to like). We were blessed by so much more than the food though. But, food is where we will begin.

We spent three weeks in Paris and in that time, I cooked dinner just once. I’ll admit, as much as I love to cook, it was really nice to have a break.

So we ate out a lot.

I won’t bore you with every detail of every single meal (you’re welcome). But, here are a few highlights.

We ate baguettes every day. They might be what I miss the most about Paris. Not joking. I have refused to eat “French bread” since we’ve been home. It is not the same. I was given a kitchen scale for Christmas so I can finally try to make my own baguettes. Wish me luck! They’re harder to make than I’d expected (more about that in the Cooking Classes post).

We ate a lot of butter. (We also walked about 3-5 miles a day…) Amazing, salted, European butter. The best butter is obligatory when eating a French baguette. Our first meal in Paris was at La Chope. We ordered ham sandwiches and got a baguette with butter and ham. Not what I’d expected. It was better. The sandwiches were simple and delicious. I had mine with my first glass of lunchtime wine, a rosé. We ate (trying to convince ourselves that we weren’t exhausted), watching people through the window. There was a man selling oysters in front of the café. People would walk up and get a sample. Most bought some too. It felt like everyone had a baguette in their bag. I knew we’d come to the right place (because of the baguettes, not the oysters… not my favorite).

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We ate a so many little cafés that I’ve lost track. Most were great, a few were just good, some were more touristy. Our preference was to dine at the ones where we felt a little out of place, but got along just fine. (Note: We didn’t experience any of the “French rudeness” that people talk about. I speak French, but Tim doesn’t. However, he tried. The server would come over to take our order and Tim would ask me how to say something, I’d translate it, and he’d repeat it to the server. All the while the server knew what we were both saying, but waited patiently for Tim to finish. My French was corrected and also complimented. We thought the French were incredibly kind people.) Our two favorite restaurants were like this and we ate surrounded by the locals, enjoying real French food.

Our favorite favorite favorite experience was at a little bistrot called Au Bon Coin, located at 49 rue des Cloys, Mairie du 18e, Paris, France. We had been in Paris just two days. We were finally getting over our jet lag and feeling a little more normal. We walked a few minutes from our little rented flat and decided to try it for lunch. It was crowded. We found a table at the back and sat down. We waited, sipping water, for menus that never came. I tried to translate the menu that was scrawled on the wall. But, even after taking 12 years of French (a long time ago), there was a lot missing from my vocabulary. The server came over and we ordered what the guy next to us was eating, with glasses of vin rouge (red wine). It looked like some sort of beef with potatoes and green beans. Seemed safe enough. It was the best meal (we went back 3 more times and ate the same thing). My goal for 2014 is to attempt to duplicate it. They may have other things on their menu, but I don’t care. I only want this. (Tim tried the Boeuf Bourguignon once. It was good too.) The beef was pink, pretty rare, but so tender and delicious. The potatoes were exactly as amazing as they’d looked. Crispy and so piping hot that I burned my mouth in my need to eat them all as quickly as possible. I need to have them in my life on a regular basis. (They might be the thing, food-wise, that I miss the second most about Paris.) The green beans weren’t the star, but they were good enough. I guess you need something to bring the meal back down to earth.

But, the food wasn’t the only reason we loved that meal. The man sitting next to us started talking to us. Eventually ending up at our table (we were at a table for 4 – note, don’t do this if you are only 2, and want to continue your meal just the two of you, they will seat someone beside you). The server said (in French), “Don’t worry. He’s nice.” and plopped his plate down next to Tim. So we continued our conversation, noticing that the older woman, who’d come in with her dog, was paying attention to us. She joined in on the conversation. I think we sat there for an hour with them, with me trying desperately to understand them and remember anything that sounded like French to say in response (while silently cursing my lack of motivation during the hours and hours of French classes that I’d taken in school!). Anytime anyone asks us about our favorite experience in Paris, this is what we tell them. Au Bon Coin is what we consider “our place” in Paris.

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Our second favorite restaurant was another little bistrot‚ just around the corner from home, called Le Brio, located at 216 rue Marcadet, 75018 Paris, France. We made friends here too, this time with the server. A sweet college student who took the time to explain the entire menu to us in English. We ate here a number of times and spent hours at their tables with our books, chatting, watching people, and eating a lot.

Our last, including our last evening in Paris we ate here. I tried the croque monsieur and we finished off the evening with some delicious chocolate cake and champagne. This place that we would see every night as we walked home from the metro felt like home.

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There was another meal that was simply incredible. It was at a café by the marché aux puces (flea market) that we went to. We didn’t have the opportunity to go a second time, but it was one of the best meals that we had in Paris. The café is called Café Le Paul Bert and is located at 20, Rue Paul Bert 93400 Saint Ouen, France. Our entire meal can be seen in that little cast iron pot. It’s chicken with the creamiest, most delicious rice, and the softest carrots imaginable. I need to discover their secret. I may have eaten (almost) the entire serving. You know when something is so good that you really shouldn’t stop even though you know you should? Yeah, that happened here. But, since we would almost always walk again after a meal, I don’t remember feeling overly full. Winner.

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There were a number of other noteworthy meals and experiences that took place around food.

I discovered is that I do not like pâté.

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I do, however, never tire of soupe a l’oignon (French onion soup). I can’t remember how many different places we tried it. Some places make it with dehydrated onions, some put the bread and cheese on the side, some make it with so much cheese there’s a huge plomp of it at the bottom of the bowl. Most were good, one or two were great. I think my favorite was at a café next to the Shakespeare and Company bookstore (although I’ll admit I felt a little sick after, maybe because it was so incredibly rich… but it was worth it).

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We tried many crème brûlées. They were all surprisingly different from one another. Some thick, some more of a crème anglaise, some with a super crunchy layer of brûléed sugar. You almost can’t go wrong here.

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We were told that we had to, at some point, try the nutella crèpes. We were wandering around one evening and found a street vender with this simple treat and ate it for dinner as we strolled down Rue Cler.

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We made coffee at home some mornings and drank it while eating croissants, baguettes with beurre, or pain au chocolate. But, it wasn’t nearly as good as the café‚ crèmes that we drank at the cafés. We never once ordered a regular cup of coffee. I’m not even sure if you can. If you order a café, you get a tiny cup of espresso. Who knows. C’est un mystére.

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I had two burgers in Paris. I’ll admit, I needed a burger and frites. Buuut, they were not from McDonalds. 😉 And, they were very good. In fact, I ate frites quite a few times. The Parisians sure know how to fry a potato.

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I sometimes have a hard time buying something at a restaurant that I can make at home. Since I have successfully made Julia Child’s Boeuf Bourguignon twice, I have no need to pay someone else to do it. But, that didn’t stop me. I mean, I was in Paris. What’s more Parisian than that (besides baguettes and many other things)?!

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The one place that we didn’t eat that I was really disappointed to miss out on was Les Deux Magots. I’d read about Julia Child eating there in My Life in France and really wanted to eat there too. It was closed for renovations. Sigh. Oh well, guess we will just have to go back.

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Now that I’m absolutely starving for all the foods I can’t have, I’m going to go make some popcorn for dinner.

Baguettes are on my to do list this week. It’s a must. I need some bread and butter.

Part two of our Paris adventure will continue next week.

Aurevoir.

Monday

19

September 2011

2

COMMENTS

What to do About Breakfast

Written by , Posted in Thoughts

I’m usually pretty hungry when I wake up. But, the most I can do is grunt a greeting to the dog, and grind beans and boil water for the French pressed coffee.

I love breakfast foods. Bacon = pretty much favorite of most any food, any time of the day. I love pancakes, french toast, cinnamon rolls, quiche, fried or scrambled eggs, fried potatoes… and on and on. But first thing in the morning, everything feels like too much work. Even cutting up fruit to go with some Greek yogurt with honey seems like a chore.

I choose not to buy breakfast bars and pastries (except for the occasional bagels from Western Bagel, which is our favorite place outside of New York’s H&H Bagels, which I just found out you can order online!!!). If we’re having sandwiches for lunch (our monthly menu has breakfast, lunch and dinner planned) I try to avoid bread at breakfast to keep things interesting. Who wants sandwich bread 2 out of 3 meals a day? Not me. This leaves me with but a few options: cereal (usually with raw almonds, to add some protein), toast with peanut butter and honey, oatmeal (getting to be “too much” work because I have to cook it), yogurt and fruit. Ideally, I would always have a few other options too: homemade granola, cheddar biscuits (great with scrambled eggs and if it’s an extra yummy morning: bacon!), bananas (makes fuit and yogurt an easy option), leftover oatmeal (east to re-heat), leftover pancakes (easy to re-heat).

What are your solutions for breakfast? Are you a cereal junkie? Do you love french toast? Do you eat oatmeal every morning? Do you have any tips to share?

I know breakfast is supposed to be the most important meal of the day. It’s relatively quick to prepare. But I still dislike making it the most, especially when I haven’t planned ahead.

Here are a few recipes I enjoy: Granola, Buttermilk Pancakes, Greek Yogurt with Granola, Fruit and Honey (mix 1/2 to 1 C Greek yogurt with 1 t to 1T honey with a whisk, then add chopped fruit and homemade granola); Cheddar Biscuits (they’re called Green Onion Drop Biscuits, but I usually add cheddar and occasionally add bacon add the onions if I feel like it), Shutterbean’s Cream Cheese Cinnamon Rolls (oh my gosh amazing!!!).

Some that I want to try: Joy The Baker’s Cheddar Black Pepper Biscuits, The Pioneer Woman’s Cinnamon Baked French Toast, Joy The Baker’s Browned Butter Blueberry Muffins, Cranberry Orange Bagels.

Here’s my variation on granola.

Homemade Granola

Last modified on 2012-04-28 00:18:59 GMT. 3 comments. Top.

Homemade Granola
Recipe Type: Breakfast
Author: Rachel Oberg – De Ma Cuisine
Prep time: 5 mins
Cook time: 3 hours
Total time: 3 hours 5 mins
This is my version of Sheila’s His Hill granola.
Ingredients
  • 5 1/2 C oats
  • 1 T honey
  • 1/2 C raw or granulated sugar
  • 1/2 C brown sugar
  • 1/4 C maple syrup
  • 1/2 C hot water
  • 1/2 C whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 3/4 C canola oil
Instructions
  1. Dissolve sugars in water. Whisk in oil.
  2. Mix dry ingredients in a separate bowl. Add wet ingredients. Stir.
  3. Spread over 2 cookie sheets*.
  4. Bake at 200 F for 2-3 hours, stirring every 30 – 60 minutes.
  5. Cool then store.
  6. *Sometimes I grease the cookie sheets, sometimes I don’t. Do what works best for you. 🙂

I love granola. I especially love it when it’s homemade. The above recipe is my version of Sheila‘s granola. Enjoy!

Monday

19

September 2011

3

COMMENTS

Homemade Granola

Written by , Posted in Breakfast

Homemade Granola
Author: 
Recipe type: Breakfast
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
This is my version of Sheila's His Hill granola.
Ingredients
  • 5½ C oats
  • 1 T honey
  • ½ C raw or granulated sugar
  • ½ C brown sugar
  • ¼ C maple syrup
  • ½ C hot water
  • ½ C whole wheat flour
  • ½ t salt
  • ¾ C canola oil
Instructions
  1. Dissolve sugars in water. Whisk in oil.
  2. Mix dry ingredients in a separate bowl. Add wet ingredients. Stir.
  3. Spread over 2 cookie sheets*.
  4. Bake at 200 F for 2-3 hours, stirring every 30 - 60 minutes.
  5. Cool then store.
  6. *Sometimes I grease the cookie sheets, sometimes I don't. Do what works best for you. 🙂

I love granola. I especially love it when it’s homemade. The above recipe is my version of Sheila‘s granola. Enjoy!